Belva Ann Lockwood Papers

Belva Ann McNall Lockwood (1830-1917), was the first woman attorney to practice before the Supreme Court. In the late 1870s Lockwood personally lobbied members of Congress to pass a special act admitting women to the bar of the Court. Lockwood first practiced before the Court in 1879. Among other cases, Lockwood successfully represented the Eastern Cherokee Indians in an five million dollar suit before the Court. She also represented hundreds of family members of Civil War veterans in their pension claims. Lockwood was also an ardent supporter of women's rights. She lectured and toured the country in attempts to gather support for woman suffrage. In 1884, and again in 1888, she was the Presidential candidate for the National Equal Rights Party, capturing over 4,000 votes in six states. Her other feminist activities included serving as president of the Woman's National Press Association, and being appointed Attorney General of the American Woman's Republic, an organization founded by Marietta Stowe and dedicated to preparing women for the rights and responsibilities of full citizenship. As an executive board member of the Universal Peace Union, Lockwood attended many international peace congresses. She wrote tracts on international arbitration and was one of the nominating members of the Nobel Peace Prize Committee. The Papers of Belva Ann Lockwood are an assortment of writings both by and about her.

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Alfred H. Love letter to Clara B. Wagner
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood grave marker photograph
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood portrait
Ormes gravemarker photograph
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood grave marker photograph
Belva Lockwood postcard
Belva Lockwood portrait
Belva Lockwood portrait
United States Senate Committee on Foreign Relations letter to Belva Lockwood
Belva Lockwood argument
Belva Lockwood lecture poster
'How I Helped to Settle the Shirt Waist Strike in Philadelphia" by Belva Lockwood
Belva Lockwood article
Belva Lockwood letter to Lella Gardner

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